While makerspaces (fablabs, hackerspaces, creative spaces) have steadily developed in libraries, university campuses, and community spaces over the past few years, these centers of innovation are often rooted in a particular place. This presentation will highlight a different model for mobile makerspaces using a variety of physical computing technologies configured into portable kits that can be shipped across campus, across town, or across the country. Designed to support experiential learning - learning through making - the makerspace focuses on computing processes rather than the products produced by them, emphasizing the process of making itself, whether successful, failed, or flawed.

Presenters:

Lindsay Mattock is an assistant professor at the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science. Her research focuses on aspects of making from various perspectives. Mattock’s Mapping the Independent Media Community project (mimcproject.org) traces the history of independent filmmaking and the Media Arts Center Movement in the United States, by mapping the connections between film and video makers and institutions supporting the creation, exhibition, preservation, and study of media during the 1970s and 80s. She also explores making as pedagogy, incorporating physical computing technologies into graduate courses at the School of Library and Information Science.

Christina Boyles-Petersen is an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Scholar of Digital Humanities at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include digital humanities, environmental humanities, and multiethnic American literature. Her published work is available in the Southern Literary JournalSouth Central ReviewPlath ProfilesPupil, and The Write Book.  

Andrew Boyles-Petersen is the Library Annex Manager for the University of Iowa Libraries. His research interests include digital humanities, user experience design, and digital librarianship.  His work emphasizes the relationship between technology and patron services in order to maximize accessibility for all users.